Strange lobbying contract between Kinshasa and an Israeli firm

The Democratic Republic of Congo is spending millions on a coordinated lobbying campaign aimed at the United States amid rising tensions over the future of its leader, Joseph Kabila. The country signed a $5.6 million contract with Mer Security and Communication Systems, an Israel-based security consulting firm, according to new disclosure forms released by the Justice Department. The contract is large even by the standards of foreign lobbying, which is a lucrative niche. While the contract appears to cover mostly advisory services — in addition to organizing a trip to…

Read More

DR Congo Senate to votes law for access to information

On 28 October 2015, the Senate of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has put a bill on access to information on its agenda, according to the Senator Moise Nyarugabo. In practice, a very small minority of the DRC population is able to access public information (such as lawyers, civil society). The exclusion of the vast majority of the Congolese population from means of access to information and participation in decision–making processes cultivates corruption, bad governance, misappropriation of public resources and violation of human rights. The senator Moise Nyarugabo reported that RTI’s Act was declared admissible by the plenary of…

Read More

Lauch of a new youth-led anti-corruption NGO in South-Kivu

We are delighted to announce the launching of the Non-for-Profit Organisation centered on anti-corruption named “Centre de Recherche sur l’Anti-Corruption” in acronym “CERC”, a landmark effort to bring the citizens together to fight against corruption in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The country is however notoriously corrupt, and it is difficult to say exactly how and where its foreign aid is used. The natural resources of the DRC are exploited for the personal gain of politicians, which keeps growth rates lower than they could be, and stifles the middle class, who have no voice. Notable donors in the DRC…

Read More

Anti-corruption strategies for Democratic Republic of the Congo

Extent of corruption against this backdrop, major international governance indicators point to persistent, widespread and endemic forms of corruption in the DRC, permeating all sectors of society. There is little evidence of progress made in anti-corruption in the post-conflict era. In 2015, the country ranked 147th of the 168 countries assessed by Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), scoring 22 on a scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (highly clean). The country has weak legal and institutional mechanisms in place to ensure accountability, as well as limited capacity to respond to the country’s daunting governance challenges. High levels of…

Read More

OSCEP, the new anti-corruption watchdog established by the government in August 2016

In july 2016, the Government had endowed the Democratic Republic of Congo with a Public Establishment called the «Observatoire de Surveillance de la Corruption et de l’Éthique Professionnelle», (OSCEP). The Government, by the decret n°16/020 du 16 july 2016, fixing the Statutes of the OSCEP, equips it with the mission of monitoring corruption and professional ethics and bring guilty in courts and tribunals. According to the press release sent to the Congolese Press Agency (ACP), OSCEP investigators will be deployed in territories and districts investigating  administrative and criminal offenses and bring it to the Justice. In waiting the creation of the General State Inspectorate,…

Read More

Chinese Billions in the DRC: What is the nature of the Chinese contract?

The Chinese Contract, originally called the “Programme de coopération  sino-congolais”, signed in 2008 between the government and a consortium of Chinese companies including Exim Bank. To finance its dilapidated infrastructures, the  DRC had swapped two of its mines in Katanga against a $ 6.5 billion loan from Exim Bank. Of this amount, 3.5 billion was for the development of Sicomines, the joint-company created to exploit copper and cobalt. And the other 3 billion were to be used to finance the road, energy, rail and social infrastructure (universities and reference hospitals in each of the 145 territories)…

Read More

Our latest posts